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James McClean Should Be Flogged Back To Derry City

Date: 15th November 2012 at 1:34 pm
Written by: | Comments (9)

The decision of Sunderland player James McClean on Saturday, in his refusal to wear a poppy en-crested shirt has sparked widespread debate, condemnation and varying conjecture within the football world and other. Opinion on the topic seems to be hanging in the balance at the present time.

Is he to be lorded for having the courage and strength of character to stand up for his beliefs?, or vilified and castigated for a decision based on questionable motives, and the alienation of not just his team mates but the football world as a whole.

It has to be stressed that we do live in a democracy, and in an environment that fosters free speech, and where we are encouraged to have our own ideas and opinions: a concept that I would wholeheartedly champion.

The problem with this specific incident only arises when we analyse it in greater depth to reveal a certain degree of hypocrisy. No one could argue that having been raised in Derry: a city with a troubled past in terms of its relationship with The British, that he doesn’t have the right to feel the way he does, and his refusal to wear a poppy based on the negative connotations that the symbol evokes within his own mindset could be justifiable.

However, for one with such strong beliefs: to the extent that he is willing to play the martyr, he seems more than comfortable in drawing his Royal Mint sponsored wages from the British system and paying thousands and thousands of pounds worth in taxes to the British Government every year: indirectly bankrolling the Armed Forces at home and abroad including places such as Northern Ireland?

I wonder if this stark realisation will encourage Mr McLean to hand in his resignation at Sunderland? I doubt it very much! Whilst he’s still being soothed to sleep every night by the dulcet tones of cold hard cash, I’d be willing to wager that his principles are somewhat cast aside: temporarily at least! In terms of having his cake and eating it, this man could give the staff at Kipling’s a run for their money!

Of course, this isn’t the first time that James McClean has openly courted controversy. After representing his country of birth(Northern Ireland) at under-21 level, he then switched allegiance to the Republic Of Ireland, much to the general bewilderment and consternation of the IFA and all the fans of the Northern Irish team. The subsequent antagonistic tweets and sarcasm laced remarks will have done little to soften the blow.

It is my personal belief that due to a very special set of circumstances both political and other that exist within Northern Ireland, that all players growing up there should have the choice of who they wish to represent if given that opportunity. The difference between James McClean and most of the people that I know in Northern Ireland, and the very reason he leaves himself open for such criticism on this point, is that they are so strong in their belief, that they would decide firmly one way or the other, instead of flirting on the fence as James McClean clearly did.

I would suggest that in both of these cases James McClean has acted out of selfishness and personal betterment rather than in accordance with any political, religious or personal doctrine.

People with values and principles, in my eyes, are to be respected and held up as a beacon of conviction. I have absolutely no issue with anyone trying to make a stand for their beliefs, in fact I’m very much an advocate of it. But, if you are going to make a stand, you need to be unwavering and give yourself to it completely. There is no evidence to suggest that James McClean can be thought of in these terms.

His behaviour is more akin to that of a spoiled child than of a moral crusader, and in the process he has taken more than a predatory nip at the hand that feeds him. He’d be the kind of vegetarian that would apply for a job in the local abattoir should the remuneration package match his needs!

In summary it should be pointed out that a slice of common sense should have prevailed here, the same common sense that allowed him to observe the minutes silence at Goodison without it conflicting too much with his beliefs. And remember James, if it all gets a little too much, I’m sure Derry City would welcome you back with open arms!

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9 thoughts on “James McClean Should Be Flogged Back To Derry City

  • Milt
    2 years ago

    Claptrap. It’s easy for you to be uncompromising from the sanctity of the keyboard. He hasn’t tried to portray himself as a moral crusader, he has just made conscientious objection to honouring the armed forces of a country that have killed members of his own country. He has every right to do that. In the same way that I injected to the war in Iraq but continued to work here and pay my taxes, a portion of which doubtless went towards furthering that “cause”. Does that make me a hypocrite? If you dig far enough back into history, I reckon you could find examples of every country treating another appallingly. By your rationale we’d have to live on the moon before we could make a conscientious objection to anything.

    We live in a country that champions freedom of speech. If you’ve got an issue with that – and you appear to, given what you’re saying – then shouldn’t you be looking to relocate, rather than take snide digs at people who’ve actually attempted to make an informed decision on a politically sensitive issue?

    Reply
  • John Smith
    2 years ago

    Ironic really that you dishonour your own war dead who fought to stop the kind of rascism and fascism that you now display so openly.

    Reply
    • Milt
      2 years ago

      Why is it racist and fascist? Please, do explain. For the record, I’m a fully signed up poppy wearing Brit. I just respect the choices of others, especially when they don’t appear to have been made on a mere whim.

      Reply
  • mathew stree
    2 years ago

    So James is aying his taxes thus “indirctly bankrolling the armed forces” eh? Shame that Rangers fc and their players didn’t eh?

    Reply
    • Dave Smith
      2 years ago

      Mathew Stree tell a lie often enough and it will become fact.

      The only time that Rangers FC didn’t pay tax was when Craig Whyte took over and he held back on the money that should have been going direct to HMRC. That was the actions of one man at a time when Rangers had reduced their debt prior to the sale to £18M.

      And i am willing to bet that you normally don’t have any respect for the armed forces and instead celebrate their existence in a manner similar to the attached youtube clip.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFx5PORkc6w

      The players didn’t know, neither did the Manager at Rangers. If they did i think they might have reported it to the authorities.

      Have a good weekend dressed up as a green seat.

      Best regards

      Reply
    • bluetoe
      2 years ago

      Whats this got to do with Rangers. Obsessed with them obviously. Love it.

      Reply
      • jaydot64
        2 years ago

        What’s it got to do with The Rangers? Well enough of you were on social network forums right after it was pointed out he didn’t wear a poppy, to wish the young man, cancer/broken legs/a good kicking etc. You lot made it YOUR fight last week, but now ‘what’s it to do with us?’ Fools

        Reply
  • Ally gee
    2 years ago

    He is dishonouring the memory of all those Irishmen of both religions who’d fought and died to not only this country but the one he claims to represent free. Do you seriously think De Valera’s support for Germany would have kept Ireland free from invasiofgn

    Reply
    • Milt
      2 years ago

      Would you rather he “dishonoured” those of his own country who died at the hands of British armed forces? Surely you can see the dilemma he’s got? I’m not saying he did “the right thing”, because in his situation there’s no “right thing”. He did what he felt was most appropriate. I don’t understand why people are getting their knickers in a twist over it, it’s all a bit sanctimonious.

      Reply

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