Chelsea

Pros And Cons Of Leaving The Bridge

Now all Chelsea fans will know our club have launched a plan to build a 60,000 capacity at the Battersea Power Station site.

The Chelsea statement read:

“Battersea Power Station is one of London’s most famous buildings and has the potential to become one of the most iconic football stadiums in the world.

Our joint bid was submitted in accordance with the sales process established by the joint administrators for the site. The process could run for a number of months.

We are not the only interested parties and there is no certainty that we will be successful.

We also appreciate that we have many significant hurdles to address if we are to build a new stadium on the site, including winning the support of our fans, the CPO shareholders and local Wandsworth residents, as well as securing the approval of Wandsworth Council, the Greater London Authority and heritage authorities.

We must also stress that making an offer for the Battersea Power Station site does not mean the club has made a definitive decision to leave Stamford Bridge.

Working with architects and planning experts, we have developed a plan to preserve all the significant aspects of Battersea Power Station.

The four iconic chimneys and wash towers along with the Grade II* listed west turbine hall and control room will be restored and retained in their original locations and provide a unique architectural backdrop to a world-class stadium with a capacity of around 60,000 seats.

Following feedback from fans, our initial plans include a 15,000 all-seated one-tier stand behind the south goal, likely to be the biggest one-tier stand in football.

Also as suggested by many fans, the stadium proposed is rectangular in shape with four separate stands. The design includes a bigger family area and more room for disabled supporters.

As well as a new home for our club, the development would include a town centre with substantial street-level retail shops, affordable housing and offices – all of which would benefit Wandsworth and bring a significant number of permanent jobs to the area.

We would also make a significant contribution towards the Northern Line Extension, a new high-volume transport link proposed for the area.

We will keep our fans updated as the process develops”.

Now this subject will divide Chelsea fans I’m sure, and to be honest I think I’m torn as I personally love Stamford Bridge at it is our true home. However, I’ve managed to compile a list of both the pros and cons of this proposed move to maybe swing people’s ideals one way or another.

Pros

More Revenue:

This is a no brainer, more fans in the stadium, the more money the club makes. If we could sell out 60,000 every home game the clubs finances would certainly improve and with the financial fair play rules coming into effect our finances have to improve. This revenue will help with investment into the club which will only help us improve and become a constant force in the Premier League and Europe but do it without putting the club into debt.

Iconic Stadium

Now the statement mentions leaving the four chimneys in place as an iconic feature of our stadium. I love this idea, I think of it alot like the dictators stand in the Olympic Stadium in Berlin. Stamford Bridge is a beautiful stadium but I think everyone will agree it is far from iconic. Personally I would love for our club to play in an iconic stadium and as vain as it sounds these types of stadiums do attract players.

Cons

Losing History

We have played our home games at Stamford Bridge since the formation of the club in 1905! When you think back to Arsenal leaving Highbury it was a great shame and I’m sure some of their fans would love to play there once more. I would hate for us to give up our history and regret it later on, Stamford Bridge is our true home and it would be very difficult to leave. Our best memories have come there and history is something which is crucial to any club.

Loss Of Home Record

Now although our home isn’t as much of a fortress as of late it is still one of the most difficult places to go in the Premier League. When moving to a new stadium any club runs the risk of losing a home fortress, especially in the early seasons as it still doesn’t really feel like home.

Loss Of Atmosphere

Stamford Bridge creates a fantastic atmosphere, especially on thise European nights! Many modern stadiums like Wembley place their fans so far away from the pitch you might as well play behind closed doors. The Bridge has the fans right on top of the opposition which can get us through those difficult games, if the new stadium ensure a great atmosphere then fine, but it seems that once you hit 60,000 capacity atmosphere goes out the window.

Limitations Of A Listed Building

Now Battersea Power Station is a Grade II listed building meaning the alterations available are limited. Take the picture at the top of the article for instance, the exterior is hardy inviting. Now I’m sure we would find a way round it but the alterations would only be slight at best meaning basically, taking the roof off, putting a pitch and seats in but overall just playing in the middle of a power station. I would like to see some computer generated images of what the final stadium may look like but until then this would be my biggest concern.

What do you think  …Stay or Go??

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